Italy Released Stamp on Cola do Rienzo

\"colaItaly  issued a commemorative stamp in honour of the 700th birth anniversary of Cola di Rienzo.Cola Di Rienzo (born1313—died Oct. 8, 1354) was the Italian popular leader who tried to restore the greatness ofancient Rome. He later became the subject of literature and song, including a novel by the English novelist E.G.E. Bulwer-Lytton (1835) and an opera byRichard Wagner(1842), both entitledRienzi.

Young Cola left Rome after his mother’s deathc.1323 to live with an uncle at nearby Anagni. He returned to Rome as a student at the age of 20, and in 1343 he was sent by the city’sgovernment to PopeClement VIinAvignonto plead the case of the Roman popular party, which had just gained ascendancy. The Pope appointed him notary of the Roman civic treasury, and Cola returned to Rome in 1344. He began to plot arevolutionthat would return the city to the glory of ancient Rome. On May 20, 1347, he summoned the people to a parliament on the Capitoline Hill. There he announced a series of edicts against the nobles, and to the acclaim of the multitude he assumed dictatorial powers. A few days later he took the ancient title oftribune.

After declaring reforms of the tax, judicial, and political structure of Rome, Cola conceived the grandiose idea of reestablishing Rome as the capital of a “sacredItaly,” an Italian brotherhood whose mission would be to spread peace and justice to the world. At a conclave held on Aug. 1, 1347, he conferred Roman citizenship on all the cities of Italy and proceeded to prepare for the election of a Roman emperor of Italy the following year.

The Roman nobles, led by the Orsini and Colonna families, rose against Cola, who repelled their attack on Nov. 20, 1347. But his triumph was short-lived; the populace became disaffected, the aristocrats continued to organize against him, and the Pope issued a bull denouncing him as a criminal, a pagan, and a heretic. A fresh uprising forced his resignation on Dec. 15, 1347, but he took refuge for two years among hermits in the Maiella Mountains of the Abruzzi region.

In 1350 Cola went toPrague, where he attempted to enlist the aid of EmperorCharles IVwith mystical prophecies. Charles, however, handed him over to the Archbishop of Prague, who yielded him to Pope Clement in July 1352. After being absolved of heresy by the Inquisition, he was freed and sent to Italy by the new pope,Innocent VI, to aid Cardinal Gil Albornoz in restoring papal authority to Rome. With the new title of senator, Cola made a triumphal return to Rome on Aug. 1, 1354.

His reinstatement was brief. Harassed by the Colonna family and driven by lack of money to desperate straits, he ruled arbitrarily. On Oct. 8, 1354, a riot broke out, and, when he attempted to address the mob, he was met with a shower of missiles. Disguising himself, he tried to mingle with the crowd but was seized and killed.

The stamp illustrates an image of the statue of Roman tribune Cola di Rienzo created by the Florentine sculptor Girolamp Masini in 1871 and located next to the “Cordonata”, the staircase to the Piazza del Campidoglio in Rome.

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