New US Stamps

Eid

\"eidDate of Issue: 8 August  2013

Featuring calligraphy from the 2011 Eid stamp with a new green background, this 2013 issuance commemorates the two most important festivals—or eids—in the Islamic calendar: Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. On these days, Muslims wish each other Eid mubarak, the phrase shown in Islamic calligraphy on the stamp. Eid mubarak translates literally as “blessed festival” and can be paraphrased “May your religious holiday be blessed.” This phrase can be applied to both Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha.

The U.S. Postal Service issued its first Eid stamp, with gold calligraphy against a blue background, on September 1, 2001. A new Eid stamp with gold calligraphy against a reddish background debuted on August 12, 2011. All Eid stamps to date have featured the work of world-renowned calligrapher Mohamed Zakariya. The art director for this stamp was Phil Jordan.

Made in America: Building a Nation

Date of Issue: 8 August  2013\"made

The Made in America: Building a Nation stamps honor the courageous workers who helped build the country. The sheet features 12 stamps in three rows of four. Eleven of the 12 stamp images were taken by photographer Lewis Hine, a chronicler of early 20th-century industry.

In the top row are an airplane maker, a derrick man on the Empire State Building, a millinery apprentice, and a man on a hoisting ball on the Empire State Building. In the middle row are a linotyper in a publishing house, a welder on the Empire State Building, a coal miner, and riveters on the Empire State Building. (The coal miner stamp is the only one of the 12 that does not feature a Hine photograph. The image is from the Kansas Historical Society.) In the bottom row are a powerhouse mechanic, a railroad track walker, a textile worker, and a man guiding a beam on the Empire State Building.

There are five different sheets available. Each one contains the same stamps, but is anchored by a different selvage photograph. Three of the five selvage photographs were taken by Hine. The Hine images include two Empire State Building iron workers and a General Electric worker measuring the bearings in a casting. The fourth selvage photograph is the same image of the coal miner that appears in the stamp pane. The final selvage photograph, taken by Margaret Bourke-White, depicts a female welder.Derry Noyes was the project’s art director and designer. The Made in America: Building a Nation stamps are being issued as Forever® stamps in self-adhesive sheets of 12

Folk Art Eagle Stamped Envelope

Date of Issue: August 9, 2013

\"usAt once both elegant and bold, the Folk Art Eagle Stamped Envelope continues a proud tradition of depicting eagles on postage that began in the late 19th century.This stamped envelope features a photograph of a plaque that shows an eagle carrying two American flags and a shield. Made from pinewood by an unknown carver, the plaque is finished with red, white, and blue paint and appears to have its original gilding.

Whether shown on the Great Seal of the United States, portrayed majestically in flight, or seen while perched atop a mountain ledge, the eagle has long been associated with patriotism. Since its adoption as our national symbol in 1782, countless artists and artisans have worked eagle motifs into paintings, pottery, furniture, courthouse decorations, quilt patterns, wood carvings, weather vanes, and other functional and decorative objects.

The Folk Art Eagle Stamped Envelope, designed by art director Richard Sheaff, is being issued as a Forever® stamped envelope. Its postage will always be equal to the value of the First-Class Mail one-ounce rate in effect at the time of use, even if the rate increases after purchase.

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One Response to New US Stamps

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