Today is Teacher’s Day

\"\"By Dr.Pradeep Jain

Since times immemorial, we have respected and idolized our teachers. Earlier, we used to call our teachers ‘Guru’ and now it’s the contemporary ‘Sir’ or ‘Madam’. Nevertheless, the role of teachers has remained the same. They were, are and will continue to be our guiding light, creating conditions conducive to our overall development. We will always be thankful to them for their constructive support. It is as an expression of this gratitude only that we celebrate Teacher’s Day in India.\"\"

\"\"Teacher’s Day is a tribute to the hard work and devotion of the teachers all year long, to educate a child. In India, teacher’s day is celebrated on 5th of September every year. Indian Teacher’s Day is dedicated to Dr. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, who was a zealous advocate of education and one of the greatest scholars and teachers of all times, apart from being the first Vice President and the second President of India. As a mark of respect to this phenomenal teacher, his birthday came to be observed as Teacher’s Day in the country.

Related Posts with Thumbnails
This entry was posted in Articles, Asian Philately, Education, First Day Cover, SARC Philately, Themes and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Today is Teacher’s Day

  1. N.A.Mirza says:

    Dear Dr. Jain:

    You are right. Teachers in the past were the ideal personalities, guiding stars and sources of inspirtion. There are people even today who say we gained some knowledge sitting under the feet our teachers. In this regard, a mother is the first teacher of a child and the home the first school. And the the teaching this way first begins from home. Dr. Radhakrishnan, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Zakir Hussain – all presidents of India – had their early education at home and worked hard for the cause of education, especially in its spread from the grassroot levels as Meghdoot Post card you used shows. However, things have changed today. Yesterday’s “Gurus” were fountains of imparting knowledge learning enjoyed respect from every corner. They believed in the upside down pyramid system of education, i.e. begin from a minor point to go up with vast knowledge. But today we follow an entirely changed system, the pyramid is flipped and children at the kindergarten level are overburdened with books, education is commercialised, most teachers work to make easy bucks, corruption is more evident in the euducational institutions. Specialization has playued its role. It is on record that India was a center of education and learning some centuries ago but today Indians move westward for learning. Well, nothning to lament but ponder and look for ways to regain our past glory.

    N.A. Mirza

  2. A very befitting philatelic tribute to Teachers on this auspicious day i.e. Teachers Day.I fully agree n endorse the views of Sh Mirza Sahib. The element of greed has deeply penetrated in this pious area too.The standards have fallen beyond imagination.

  3. Sudhir Jain says:

    OUR RESPECTFUL PRANAM TO ATT THE HON’BLE TEACHERS.
    HAPPY TEACHERS DAY.

  4. SUNIL KUMAR GARG says:

    No Gurujee, for decades now. No fault of kids! Can there be a
    teacher in a 16 Yr. old making part time money tutioning
    a 8/10 yr. old child? And with the western system of a 2nd Yr
    student taking class of First Yr. newbies the word teacher
    acquires an altogether new dimension.

  5. Anil Nawlakhe says:

    I wish to take attention of all philatelic researchers that Indian Department of Post recently issued the ‘Guidelines for Use of Images of Postage Stamps’ and are available as separate document at
    The Philately page of website of Indian post separately mentions the ‘Conditions for reproduction of Stamp Images’ as
    Re- production of stamps is allowed for illustration purposes in Philatelic Publication or in an article relating wholly on postage stamps which may appear in any magazine, newspaper or publication of a general character. Such reproduction should however , be only in black. If stamps are to be produced in colour for publicity purposes, prior permission of the Director General of Posts must be obtained. To avoid similarity with the postage , such reproduction must be distinctively in smaller or larger sizes than the actual stamp and must be without perforation on the edges. Further, across bar will also be placed on one- corner of the stamp, obliterating the denomination. It must be noted that reproduction of the stamp in colour of the actual size of the stamp with perforation of the edges may be deemed to be taken as production of the actual stamp.

    This (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Stamps/Public_domain) wiki page tries to list all stamps that are in public domain, listed by country. And this (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Stamps/Public_domain#India) page provides information on Indian situation. And the wiki pages at (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:Notice_board_for_India-related_topics/Archive_25#Indian_Stamps) and (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Administrators%27_noticeboard/Archive59#Fair_use_stamps:_revisitied_…) gives earlier discussions on fair use of stamp images.
    Hope a healthy discussion on the issue of new guidelines will be initiated from philatelists for promotion of postage stamps as material of research.

  6. You now have either a vocal coach or a book and CDs that
    can help guide you and teach you how to sing longer notes,
    sing more powerfully, or sing well in both your head voice and chest voice.

    You have to take full responsibility for your own singing lessons and you must get good vocal teacher to facilitate
    your voice training. Here the players will gain invaluable experience using
    their skills in live, game-like conditions with minimum
    interference from the coach.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *