Ireland:Stamps on Renewable Energy Technology

\"\"An Post issued  five stamps on 5th Aug 2011 to highlight the development of renewable energy technologies in Ireland.The stamps illustrate five specific types of renewable energy technologies; wind, hydro, solar, wave and biofuel.

Wind generated electricity has made huge strides in recent years; its capacity currently is close to 1,500 MW, mainly from about 90 onshore wind farms.Hydro energy is energy that is taken from water and converted to electricity. The most common method of using energy from water is a hydroelectric dam, where water coming down through an area causes turbines to rotate and the energy is captured to run a generator.Although Ireland has a reputation for rain, there’s enough sunshine for substantial use of solar power, using solar panels to capture sunlight and turn it into electricity. A growing number of households are now using solar panels on the roofs of their houses to generate much of their electricity.

Waves and tides along the Irish coast offer enormous possibilities; the sea is a limitless and reliable source of power. It is predicted that Ireland could install 30,000 MW of wave energy conversion facilities by 2030.Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. In the context of biomass for energy this is often used to mean plant based material, but biomass can equally apply to both animal and vegetable derived material. Biofuel is the term for biomass that has been converted into liquid fuel.The use of these energy sources reduces our greenhouse gas emissions and diversifies our energy supply.

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